Maestra Mars
#culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacher

#culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacher

#culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacher

#culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacher

This week we talked about families and who lives with you. #families
#culturallyresponsiveteaching
#teacher

This week we talked about families and who lives with you. #families
#culturallyresponsiveteaching
#teacher

Today I was doing an activity about being multicultural educators and our cultural identities came up. This brought about 2 issues.

1. While talking about our nationalities, 2 women referred to themselves as “mutts”. That’s fine- to me that means they have no cultural identity- that’s where they’re at. After the second person I had to step in. I said, “I understand what you mean when you say mutt, but as a biracial person I find that offensive. We have to be careful about the terminology that we use because we don’t want to offend others. If you are talking to students and say that someone mixed is a “mutt” they might feel very disrespected.”

2. Then a woman said “we’re all Americans”. WTH? I instantly remembered these clips from Last Chance for Eden. I told her that many people aren’t treated as though they are Americans, and referenced Miss America, who was born & raised here but came under fire for not being “American” enough to be crowned Miss America. Then, later, I got even more pissy about it because she works with a lot of undocumented immigrant students. They are definitely not “American” and many First Nations peoples don’t like to be called American because when they were here it sure as hell wasn’t called America. 

I really enjoy learning and practicing talking to people and helping them see the world in another way, but I’m still surprised and amazed at the ignorance and privilege every time I hear it. 

I guess that’s a good thing, bc if I stop being surprised that means I have accepted it.

Culturally Responsive Teaching

One of the things I’m struggling with this year is my view that culturally responsive teaching has to start with learning, exploring, and understanding our own identity, bias, & prejudice etc. and how those ideas were formed throughout our lives. Others have told me that CRT can be integrated into instruction without first understanding this. I disagree.

I’m also wondering, well, isn’t CRT just being a good teacher? Can we really teach this? The answer that I have found is that yes, CRT can become a natural value and practice if people first have the experiences of…. learning, exploring, and understanding our own identity, bias, & prejudice etc. and we are back to where I started.

Looking for culturally responsive books at the school library, found 2 different books on America Ferrera but none on Malcolm X in the bilingual section. In the English section I found this gem. WTH?

Looking for culturally responsive books at the school library, found 2 different books on America Ferrera but none on Malcolm X in the bilingual section. In the English section I found this gem. WTH?

deejaybird:

If you ever visit Melanasia and Australia one cannot help but be amazed by the striking blond hair of some of its inhabitants, since these Pacific islands are populated by some of the darkest skinned people in the world. The Aboriginal people of Australia and the South Pacific islands, such as the Solomon Islands,Vanuatu, and Fiji at birth are born with blond hair. In maturity the hair usually turns a darker brown color, but sometimes remains blond. Now, a study of people from the Solomon Islands shows that they evolved the striking blonde trait independently of people in Europe. These Aborigines are the oldest continuous population outside of Africa. The modern Aborigines are the direct descendants of the first explorers to leave Africa and arrive in the South Pacific 50,000 to 70,000 years ago. Scientist believe this genetic mutation appeared in Europe only about 11,000 years ago during the last ice age. THE ORIGINAL BLONDS…….

Blondies

deejaybird:

If you ever visit Melanasia and Australia one cannot help but be amazed by the striking blond hair of some of its inhabitants, since these Pacific islands are populated by some of the darkest skinned people in the world. The Aboriginal people of Australia and the South Pacific islands, such as the Solomon Islands,Vanuatu, and Fiji at birth are born with blond hair. In maturity the hair usually turns a darker brown color, but sometimes remains blond. Now, a study of people from the Solomon Islands shows that they evolved the striking blonde trait independently of people in Europe. These Aborigines are the oldest continuous population outside of Africa. The modern Aborigines are the direct descendants of the first explorers to leave Africa and arrive in the South Pacific 50,000 to 70,000 years ago. Scientist believe this genetic mutation appeared in Europe only about 11,000 years ago during the last ice age. THE ORIGINAL BLONDS…….

Blondies

deejaybird:

United States of America, Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Anguilla, Antigua, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Kitts, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent, Trinidad, Turks-and-Caicos

deejaybird:

United States of America, Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Anguilla, Antigua, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Kitts, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent, Trinidad, Turks-and-Caicos

Something so sad about this pic, I tell ya. Can you imagine growing up without dolls that looks like you? I can. :(

Something so sad about this pic, I tell ya. Can you imagine growing up without dolls that looks like you? I can. :(